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English grammar/usage question

Lately 've been seeing a conjugation of the verb "to pet" that sounds unfamiliar to me. I'm curious what others think.
Poll #1119227 English usage question

You are reading the autobiography of a companion animal. Which seems more correct to you?

"I like to be pet behind the ears."
2(2.2%)
"I like to be petted behind the ears."
51(57.3%)
Both the above are correct
7(7.9%)
Something else (explain in comments)
3(3.4%)
Tickybox!
2(2.2%)

Comments

( 29 comments — Leave a comment )
gramina
Jan. 11th, 2008 12:43 am (UTC)
I would also not be shocked to see -- very colloquially -- "I like pettin's." (Note, however, that the apostrophe is the one from "don't" not the one from "Firecat's"! -- the root word is "pettings.")
wordweaverlynn
Jan. 11th, 2008 12:53 am (UTC)
Gabriel says . . .
"I like to be petted until I suddenly don't enjoy it any more. Then I like to bite the hands that pet me."
(Deleted comment)
abostick59
Jan. 11th, 2008 01:22 am (UTC)
"I like to be scratched" (or "scritched") "behind the ears."

("petted" sounds correct to me, not "pet")
elainegrey
Jan. 11th, 2008 01:26 am (UTC)
Yes, i was thinking scritched, as well.
dandelion_diva
Jan. 11th, 2008 05:53 am (UTC)
Me too. For some reason, both "pets" sound wrong to me in this context.
brooksmoses
Jan. 11th, 2008 01:49 am (UTC)
I'm not entirely sure that "be pet" is wrong; in some tones of voice in my head it sounds okay, and some it sounds incorrect.

Mostly I think it's wrong, though, so that's what I checked. I certainly wouldn't use it myself.
jinian
Jan. 11th, 2008 02:11 am (UTC)
Wrongity wrong, with a side of wtf. Never heard of that one before.
pameladean
Jan. 11th, 2008 02:18 am (UTC)
This has been bugging me for years. Otherwise perfectly articulate and literate people use "pet" as the past tense and as the participle. I have no idea where that comes from. It always makes me think that there must be a lost verb, "peet," that's some specialized form of scritching.

P.
firecat
Jan. 11th, 2008 07:43 am (UTC)
a lost verb, "peet," that's some specialized form of scritching.

*snrch*

"to stroke with a cup of very strong coffee"?
pameladean
Jan. 11th, 2008 11:39 pm (UTC)
Hee. I must use that on my sweetie who is a Peet's fan.

P.
mistdog
Jan. 11th, 2008 10:45 am (UTC)
I think it probably comes from a wild guess that pet works like put.
firecat
Jan. 11th, 2008 08:26 pm (UTC)
Or set?
pameladean
Jan. 11th, 2008 11:41 pm (UTC)
Probably.

But why not "get," then? I like to be potten behind the ears.

You know, I'm not at all sure that I do.

P.
porcinea
Jan. 11th, 2008 02:22 am (UTC)
It is, after all, the biography *of a companion animal*. I'm not sure I'd expect perfect English from such.
clawfoot
Jan. 11th, 2008 02:51 am (UTC)
That was pretty much my take on it, too. Anything written in the first person can get away, grammatically, with just about anything, especially if the narrator isn't expected to be a master of the language.

That said, I think "be petted" is correct, and "be pet" is acceptable in colloquial speech.
pyrzqxgl
Jan. 11th, 2008 03:37 am (UTC)
I would only expect to see the first if it was either some sort of dialect or else some kind of tiny magical animal that would ride around curled behind/around your ear keeping a running commentary going.
micheinnz
Jan. 11th, 2008 06:19 am (UTC)
New Zealanders don't use "pet" that way at all. We "pat" animals, and use more specific words for humans.
beaq
Jan. 12th, 2008 02:40 am (UTC)
When you stroke an animal, as opposed to light tapping with the hand, what is that called? Patting here would be the latter.
micheinnz
Jan. 12th, 2008 04:12 am (UTC)
Stroking. We don't use "pet" regarding touching an animal at all (unless it's to refer to the animal itself -- we don't pet our pets).
nolly
Jan. 11th, 2008 07:06 am (UTC)
"Pet" is active; "be petted" is passive. "Be pet" makes me itch.
baratron
Jan. 11th, 2008 04:33 pm (UTC)
Yup. This.
(Deleted comment)
innerdoggie
Jan. 11th, 2008 09:49 pm (UTC)
I've never heard anybody use "pet" that way. Are they like my cow-orkers (of multiple ethnic groups) who refuse to use past participles of irregular verbs?

"I had went to the store yesterday, as I have did every day after work for the last week. I had saw that the store had a different item on sale each day. On Friday, they were out of the advertised item, and I have sang the blues ever since."
(Deleted comment)
pir_anha
Jan. 11th, 2008 11:40 pm (UTC)
Re: English grammar/usage question
at least it's not "i can likes pet behind the ears", though i suppose i'd deserve bad grammar if i read the "autobiography" of a companion animal.

actually "pet" sounds wrong even with the correct grammar; that's not the verb i'd expect behind the ears. :) "scritched", "rubbed" would work better.

i seem to recall that some people in minnesota used "pet" instead of "petted" when i lived there. i don't think i heard it anywhere else.
beaq
Jan. 12th, 2008 02:42 am (UTC)
I like petting behind my ears.

I don't like to be pet. I like to be master.
7patches
Jan. 27th, 2008 07:00 am (UTC)
Hi, I just added you to my LJ friends list.
I searched for a posting that I could comment on, for this purpose.
I may have heard 'pet' in Western PA, but not elsewhere.
firecat
Jan. 27th, 2008 08:03 am (UTC)
Re: Hi, I just added you to my LJ friends list.
Hi there! I added you back. :)
( 29 comments — Leave a comment )

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