?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

This is coming up for me as a result of a combination of things, including: having started to read Star Trek the Reboot fanfic, conversations I heard at Wiscon, and posts I saw today, including this one.

Describe science fiction fandom.
Describe media fandom.
What fandoms do you consider yourself to belong to or feel some affinity with?
What terms do you use to describe them?

Tags:

Comments

( 41 comments — Leave a comment )
(Deleted comment)
firecat
May. 28th, 2009 08:27 pm (UTC)
I'm new to media fandom. What is a ship war?
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 09:17 pm (UTC)
Oh, Stef. :)

Would you like me to point you to some Harmonian vs. Damn, can't remember the term wank (that would be the people who think that Harry and Hermione belong together vs. people who can understand the English language and understand that Ron and Hermione were intended to be a couple pretty much from the get-go)? Or perhaps some Edward/Bella vs. Jacob/Bella wank?

There's non-canon ship (relationship) war wank out there, too, but those are the ones that really stick in my mind.
firecat
May. 28th, 2009 09:21 pm (UTC)
See, I told you I was new to it.

OK, so a ship war is an argument about which pairings in a particular book/show are...canon? (If you need to point me to the wank to answer this, go ahead.)
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 09:27 pm (UTC)
I'm working on my answer to the other one, but the answer to this one is not so much about which pairings are canon, but which pairings are...how to put this?...right For certain values of "right" that have nothing to do with an honest reading of text.

I'm going to put a link to Fandom_Wank in my other post; you can browse through there (the Harmonian wank has its own community, however) to get some ideas.
firecat
May. 28th, 2009 09:29 pm (UTC)
OK, so like vi vs. emacs for slash. Thanks!
janetmiles
May. 28th, 2009 09:44 pm (UTC)
/me collapses, giggling helplessly
(Deleted comment)
onceupon
May. 28th, 2009 08:42 pm (UTC)
I have read a HUGE amount of ST the Reboot fanfic/slash since I got back. There is some really great stuff out there.

As for the rest:

Sci-fi fandom: a group of people who enjoy science fiction across media.
Media fandom: I don't actually know a lot about media fandom but it seems to involve products that are serial in nature presented in not-book formats.
I don't belong to any specific fandoms. I am a fan of many things but a lot of fandom behaviors are a barrier to my participation in a group setting.

There was an interesting Book Fandom vs. Media Fandom panel one morning that determined, in too many instances, book fandom was being used as shorthand for old hidebound conservatives while media fandom was everyone who was progressive and with it when it comes to technology. *laugh* I do think book fans tend to be a little less involved in immediate response when it comes to online stuff.
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 09:15 pm (UTC)
I hope firecat won't mind, but because I am curious...

have you read any of mine? ;)
onceupon
May. 28th, 2009 09:18 pm (UTC)
I don't know! Most of the stuff I have read has been anonymous - tons of stuff from st_xi_kinks and there's a McCoy meme somewhere that I have to track back down and links to personal journals. I HAVE seen you comment in a few places.

Where is yours, if you don't mind? Because now I want to read it!
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 09:25 pm (UTC)
I don't mind you asking at all! /me is totally greedy for comments.

Here's my st_reboot listing: http://community.livejournal.com/st_reboot/tag/author:+sistercoyote

That's:

Pushing It (Kirk/Spock, Soft NC-17, essentially non-con but no actual sex occurs, breath play, an interpretation of what's going on in Kirk's mind when Spock's strangling him on the bridge)
No Complaints (Kirk/McCoy, really soft PG, some kissing, no sex, Kirk tries to get a reluctant and bruised McCoy to talk to him during their Academy days)
and
A little untitled drablet about what's going on in McCoy's head when they're on the shuttle to the space dock.
ljgeoff
May. 28th, 2009 11:40 pm (UTC)
Thanks for the recs! Here's some more ST.

My own reboot drabble, no sex, is here.

I never got into the HP stuff, but I'm big into DW.
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 11:41 pm (UTC)
HP I get. What's DW?

Also, because I forgot to mention it earlier, I'm working on a Mirror!McCoy/Standard!Kirk fic at the moment, but I won't be posting it until some time in June.
ljgeoff
May. 28th, 2009 11:53 pm (UTC)
Doctor Who -- Oh, there are other fandoms? :)
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 11:54 pm (UTC)
D'oh. I should have been able to figure that out!
ljgeoff
May. 28th, 2009 11:57 pm (UTC)
I messed up the link. That's Teaspoon. I'm over there as "LJG" and I've got ever_was.
ljgeoff
May. 29th, 2009 12:20 am (UTC)
Oh! And st_reboot! I'm in luurve!

Edited at 2009-05-29 12:22 am (UTC)
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 09:15 pm (UTC)
I can't define fandom, but I know it when I see it. SciFi or Fantasy or media.

Fandom scares the hell out of me (despite the fact that I have been unashamedly writing fanfic lately) and so I don't consider myself to belong to any particular fandom nor do I feel any affinity with any particular fandom. I consider myself to be a "fan of" a particular show, actor, or band, but wouldn't consider myself part of that fandom.

Well, okay. I occasionally refer to myself as a Browncoat or a Trekkie, but that's usually in a context where I know the person will understand what that is and don't have to worry about defining things further. I am not, and have never been, a Durannie.

I don't often use a specific term to reference the things of which I am a fan, other than their names.
firecat
May. 28th, 2009 09:18 pm (UTC)
If you are willing to discuss it:

Why does fandom scare you?

Is a Browncoat or a Trekkie a fan of a particular show, or a member of a fandom, or both?

What is a Durannie?
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 09:35 pm (UTC)
I think that, if I'm going to be completely honest about it, part of the reason fandom scares me has to do with introversion and my reluctance to be lumped in with any particular group. That said,

I know that 90% of fans out there are absolutely sane and probably wonderful people. But I've both encountered a few psychos in my own time in fandom, and also I read fandom_wank from time-to-time (and I comment over there as well) and the people that the Fandom_Wank folks (also known as "wankas") point out really scare me, because their grasps on reality are tenuous at best.

A Browncoat is a fan of the Joss Whedon show "Firefly." They have named themselves, and the name they chose was the losing side of the war in that particular show's universe. Browncoats actually scare me less than other groups, because they do seem to be largely sane. (In fact, a lot of the Browncoat stuff I've seen has been charity work.)

A Trekkie is a member of the Star Trek fandom (which is the same as being a fan of the show). I don't actually consider myself a hard-core Trekkie, despite the fact that once upon a time I had a copy of the Starfleet Academy handbook and a bumper sticker that said "This car runs on impulse power." The hardcore ones are the ones who speak Klingon and who are in the process of translating various Earthly works into said language, and who have hours-long arguments about whether or not the replicator was malfunctioning when X event happened. Unlike the Browncoats, Trekkies did not name themselves (the name was originally an insult applied to those folks who wrote the studio to save the show) and some Trekkies will insist they be called "Trekkers." As I am a believer in letting people call themselves what they will, I do so.

I just realized that I don't think there are fandom names as such for fans of Tolkien/LOTR and Star Wars. Not sure why that is.

A Durannie is a fan of the band Duran Duran, but when I use it I tend to apply it to the kind of disturbing and disturbed fan who would have crushed others to get closer to the stage, for example, or (to use an actual example) who would use sex to have the room service guys sneak them up to the band members' rooms. A Duran groupie, in essence, which I think is different from a fan of the band.
firecat
May. 28th, 2009 09:37 pm (UTC)
Thank you. I need to write another post about my personal history with fandom/being a fan of various things, because it ties in with why I made this post.
sistercoyote
May. 29th, 2009 12:00 am (UTC)
I will be very interested to read that post. I seldom talk about what few fandom activities I participate in, when I participate, because I worry about boring people.

I think to me in some ways fandom is similar to a shared hobby - I think ljgeoff's "shared community" works. I know that there is Mercedes Lackey fandom for her Valdemar series that has led to some of the fen (plural of "fan," and I have no idea when that came into vogue) getting published in official short story collections. (Queen's Own is the official fansite.
jenk
May. 28th, 2009 11:05 pm (UTC)
Durannie

Heh. Springsteen fans are sometimes called tramps (from the line "tramps like us" in Born to Run) but also just, you know, Bruce fans.

I will note that I felt no fear walking from Madison Square Garden to my hotel in Times Square at midnight within a couple knots of Bruce fans, even though I'd never met them before. "Hey, you were at the show?" "Yeah, I came from Seattle." "Cool! Hey, are you on the mailing list?" Etc.

Edited at 2009-05-28 11:05 pm (UTC)
sistercoyote
May. 28th, 2009 11:17 pm (UTC)
I've had similar experiences with Duran fans (including walking through an area of LA where we probably really weren't safe). On the other hand, I've met more Duran fans who were Persons in Desperate Need of a Reality Check.

Possibly the safest I've ever felt was in the midst of a group of Highlander fen - and I've never been a member of the fandom!
hfnuala
May. 28th, 2009 09:42 pm (UTC)
Science fiction fandom is a nebulous group of people who both read and want to discuss science fiction and also end up talking about other things. This can be at cons, on mailing lists, via zines/apas, on livejournal or through local/society meetings. I consider myself a science fiction fan, mostly on line and mostly lurking. I've been to a scattering of cons - 3 or 4 when I was a student, one Wiscon, a WorldCon and an EaterCon.

Media fandom is a similar group of people only the hook is a tv show (fiction or 'reality') or fim(s) or anime. I don;t consider myself a media fan, though I have some tendencies.

I call myself a skiffy fan because it amuses me.
hfnuala
May. 28th, 2009 09:45 pm (UTC)
Oh and to make explicit the implicit exclusion above, when categorising Science Fiction fandom I believe it requires books. And not movie tie-ins either.
ljgeoff
May. 28th, 2009 11:51 pm (UTC)
I think that science fiction fandom is really too big for a glib description. It's a shared experience - through books or tv or movies, shared language, shared delights and frustrations.

Maybe you could say that it's people who fall in love with make-believe worlds; make-believe that goes beyond the usuall storytelling creation of characters to the make-believe of realities.
(Deleted comment)
firecat
May. 29th, 2009 04:49 pm (UTC)
and are no more than two degrees of hugs from Jon Singer.

HAHAHAHA! Yes.
sistercoyote
May. 29th, 2009 09:54 pm (UTC)
I apparently don't count because I have no idea who Jon Singer is. :)
firecat
May. 29th, 2009 10:16 pm (UTC)
Jon Singer is a fan who knows a whole lot of people, to the point where it has become a joke:
In the square in the Vatican, as the assembled multitude looks up to see two figures emerging onto the grand balcony, someone down in the crowd elbows their neighbor and says, "Hey, who's that guy up there with Singer?" -- "the classic [Jon] Singer joke," as told by elisem
I don't think hugging is required in order to belong to fandom, and I haven't met you in person so hugs between us are theoretical. But I know him and he's on my LJ friends list (jonsinger), so you are one or two degrees from him by LJ, if I am understanding the degrees of separation concept.
wyvernwell
May. 29th, 2009 11:53 pm (UTC)
Okay.

Spent three years of my life doing more things that you can count in LOTR fandom incl. meeting and hanging with celebs and film crews, costuming and performing, art, and reading/writing fanfic. To describe fandom I'd say it's a media phenomenon in any format that becomes a hobby.

Fandom is fun and time consuming. It's an opportunity to meet new people and hang out with old friends. It can be expensive. It can also be memorable.

One of the best things about LOTR fandom is that in general it is a very sane, creative, mature, intelligent, and literary group. Tolkien-based stuff goes different places than, you know, something like Pokemon fandom.

My OTP = Sam and Frodo. It's a very typical boring everyday OTP and is practically canon, but S/F shippers get very passionate about their OTP and sometimes there is spillover into "real person slash" which is kind of dumb IMHO. The most stupid thing in the fandom was a massive fandom wank involving a group of ppl called "tinhats" who were convinced that Elijah Wood and Dominic Monaghan were sleeping together. I still scratch my head over that.

YAY ST REBOOT :)
firecat
May. 30th, 2009 12:26 am (UTC)
Thanks!

I really wish I had had LOTR fans to hang out with when I was about 8-12 years old. (Not so much for slash purposes, but I was very identified with LOTR and didn't have anyone to talk to about it except my dad.)

What is "real person slash"? The idea that the actors who play the characters are sleeping together? Hm, that sounds kind of dumb to me too. (I'm all for leaving celebrities' personal lives alone, in general.)
sistercoyote
May. 30th, 2009 02:34 am (UTC)
That's a fair enough description of RPS/RPF, although bandom kind of blurs the line (particularly in well-done bandfic [pls note: not "badfic" which is a whole other animal]); how much of a musician's public persona is a role they take on and how much is the musician themself? Bowie is a particularly interesting manifestation of this phenomenon, by the way.

I used to write bandslash for Duran, but never once have I thought that the real band members had sex with each other. Well, maybe once, but that had more to do with Simon kissing John on stage than anything else. I stopped out of boredom with the band more than anything.

However, a lack of understanding that actor != role does seem to be endemic in a lot of actor!RPS. I never really read other bandslash or bandfic, so I can't speak to it; Duran fans in general seem pretty rational on this point (one of the few places they are, oddly), and the band seems more amused by it than anything. If they'd ever said anything that implied they found it objectionable, I would have stopped.

Man, am I rambling on.
firecat
May. 30th, 2009 05:35 am (UTC)
how much of a musician's public persona is a role they take on and how much is the musician themself? Bowie is a particularly interesting manifestation of this phenomenon, by the way.

OK, I can see that...
slothman
May. 30th, 2009 12:35 am (UTC)
(Here via sistercoyote.)

Science fiction fandom is the general-purpose catch-all that pulls in everyone interested in all shades of science fiction and fantasy. I usually find so much that interests me at science fiction conventions that I wish I could send multiple instances of myself to catch parallel panels. What attracts me is the joy of playing with ideas, and the chance to learn about cutting-edge developments from people who invent futures (or fantastic pasts) for a living. As an example of ideas at play: one of my favorite regular panelists at BayCon, Pat MacEwen, is a physical anthropologist with a CSI day job who moonlights as an SF writer and does presentations on Alien Sex, where she presents bizarre mating behaviors from terrestrial species and invites the audience to speculate on what an alien society evolved for that would be like, and almost as often she’ll bring people up to date on the latest climate change science.

Media fandom tends to concentrate on particular shows (or genres, in the anime fields), which narrows the field considerably. I don’t really get into individual shows and movies enough that I really feel like there’s much for me at a media convention; from what I see of them, there may be panels on particular anime series, but I have yet to see one like “Shinto Mythology and Tonari no Totoro”, or “Modern Cybernetic Advances and the Works of Masamune Shirow”. I’m the sort who would much rather have a memory of a good conversation with an author than an autograph from them, and I’d be more interested in meeting a scriptwriter who wrote a good story than the actor who performed it.

I don’t have any issues with media fandom or furry fandom; I take the geek hierarchy as a joke. Those things don’t float my particular boat, but I know fun people who enjoy them all.
firecat
May. 30th, 2009 02:00 am (UTC)
I wish I could send multiple instances of myself to catch parallel panels

There was much talk of this at Wiscon, yes.

“Shinto Mythology and Tonari no Totoro”, or “Modern Cybernetic Advances and the Works of Masamune Shirow”

I would go to those! Why don't media cons have them?
slothman
May. 30th, 2009 02:25 am (UTC)
Anime cons have lots of amazing costuming work (“cosplay”) and fan-created anime music videos, so there’s a lot of splendid creativity going on there; perhaps the fans there have a strong attraction to visual arts and not as much to the more abstract things like history and culture?
firecat
May. 30th, 2009 03:56 am (UTC)
So we need an anime con for left brain types?
slothman
May. 30th, 2009 07:10 am (UTC)
I’d characterize it as for abstract rather than visual thinkers, but yes, I think it would be cool to put together that kind of a programming track for an anime convention— learn about the culture and history behind many of the things you see in anime, and of good depictions of future tech.
( 41 comments — Leave a comment )

Latest Month

April 2017
S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30      
Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by chasethestars